First Version Of This Webpage Published

First version of this webpage published citation

This page contains reference examples for webpages, including the following:

1. Webpage on a news website

  • Provide the specific date the comment was published. Provide the comment title or up to the first 20 words of the comment in standard font. Then in square brackets write “Comment on the webpage” and the title of the webpage on which the comment appeared in sentence case and italics.
  • The two most recent versions are selected by default when you first view the history (that is why they appear framed and have a different background, see horizontal area below 4). Let's say you want to compare the versions corresponding to numbers 10 & 11 on the image. First, click the left radio button next to number 11.

Bologna, C. (2019, October 31). Why some people with anxiety love watching horror movies. HuffPost. https://www.huffpost.com/entry/anxiety-love-watching-horror-movies_l_5d277587e4b02a5a5d57b59e

The beginning of the Web as a publicly available service on the Internet arrived on August 6, 1991, when Berners-Lee published the first-ever website. Fittingly, the site was about the World Wide.

Roberts, N. (2020, June 10). Trayvon Martin’s mother, Sybrina Fulton, qualifies to run for elected office. BET News. https://www.bet.com/news/national/2020/06/10/trayvon-martin-mother-sybrina-fulton-qualifies-for-office-florid.html

Toner, K. (2020, September 24). When Covid-19 hit, he turned his newspaper route into a lifeline for senior citizens. CNN. https://www.cnn.com/2020/06/04/us/coronavirus-newspaper-deliveryman-groceries-senior-citizens-cnnheroes-trnd/index.html

  • Parenthetical citations: (Bologna, 2019; Roberts, 2020; Toner, 2020)
  • Narrative citations: Bologna (2019), Roberts (2020), and Toner (2020)
  • Use this format for articles from news websites. Common examples are BBC News, BET News, Bloomberg, CNN, HuffPost, MSNBC, Reuters, Salon, and Vox. These sites do not have associated daily or weekly newspapers.
  • Use the newspaper article category for articles from newspaper websites such as The New York Times or The Washington Post.
  • Provide the writer as the author.
  • Provide the specific date the story was published.
  • Provide the title of the news story in italic sentence case.
  • List the name of the news website in the source element of the reference.
  • End the reference with the URL.

2. Comment on a webpage on a news website

Owens, L. (2020, October 7). I propose a bicycle race between Biden and Trump [Comment on the webpage Here’s what voters make of President Trump’s COVID-19 diagnosis]. HuffPost. https://www.spot.im/s/00QeiyApEIFa

  • Parenthetical citation: (Owens, 2020)
  • Narrative citation: Owens (2020)
  • Credit the person who left the comment as the author using the format that appears with the comment (i.e., a real name and/or a username). The example shows a real name.
  • Provide the specific date the comment was published.
  • Provide the comment title or up to the first 20 words of the comment in standard font. Then in square brackets write “Comment on the webpage” and the title of the webpage on which the comment appeared in sentence case and italics.
  • Provide the name of the news website in the source element of the reference.
  • Link to the comment itself if possible. Otherwise, link to the webpage on which the comment appears. Either a full URL or a short URL is acceptable.

3. Webpage on a website with a government agency group author

National Institute of Mental Health. (2018, July). Anxiety disorders. U.S. Plogue bidule keygen mac osx. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health. https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/anxiety-disorders/index.shtml

  • Parenthetical citation: (National Institute of Mental Health, 2018)
  • Narrative citation: National Institute of Mental Health (2018)
  • For a page on a government website without individual authors, use the specific agency responsible for the webpage as the author.
  • The names of parent agencies not present in the author element appear in the source element (in the example, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health). This creates concise in-text citations and complete reference list entries.
  • Provide as specific a date as possible for the webpage.
  • Some online works note when the work was last updated. If this date is clearly attributable to the specific content you are citing rather than the overall website, use the updated date in the reference.
  • Do not include a date of last review in a reference because content that has been reviewed has not necessarily been changed. If a date of last review is noted on a work, ignore it for the purposes of the reference.
  • Italicize the title of the webpage.
  • End the reference with the URL.

4. Webpage on a website with an organizational group author

World Health Organization. (2018, May 24). The top 10 causes of death. https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/the-top-10-causes-of-death

First Version Of This Webpage Published Version

  • Parenthetical citation: (World Health Organization, 2018)
  • Narrative citation: World Health Organization (2018)
  • For a page from an organization’s website without individual authors, use the name of the organization as the author.
  • Provide as specific a date as possible for the webpage.
  • Some online works note when the work was last updated. If this date is clearly attributable to the specific content you are citing rather than the overall website, use the updated date in the reference.
  • Do not include a date of last review in a reference because content that has been reviewed has not necessarily been changed. If a date of last review is noted on a work, ignore it for the purposes of the reference.
  • Italicize the title of the webpage.
  • Because the author of the webpage and the site name are the same, omit the site name from the source element to avoid repetition.
  • End the reference with the URL.

5. Webpage on a website with an individual author

Giovanetti, F. (2019, November 16). Why we are so obsessed with personality types. Medium. https://medium.com/the-business-of-wellness/why-we-are-so-obsessed-with-personality-types-577450f9aee9

  • Parenthetical citation: (Giovanetti, 2019)
  • Narrative citation: Giovanetti (2019)
  • When individual author(s) are credited on the webpage, list them as the author in the reference.
  • Provide as specific a date as possible for the webpage.
  • Some online works note when the work was last updated. If this date is clearly attributable to the specific content you are citing rather than the overall website, use the updated date in the reference.
  • Do not include a date of last review in a reference because content that has been reviewed has not necessarily been changed. If a date of last review is noted on a work, ignore it for the purposes of the reference.
  • Italicize the title of the webpage.
  • Provide the site name in the source element of the reference.
  • End the reference with the URL.

6. Webpage on a website with a retrieval date

U.S. Census Bureau. (n.d.). U.S. and world population clock. U.S. Department of Commerce. Retrieved January 9, 2020, from https://www.census.gov/popclock/

  • Parenthetical citation: (U.S. Census Bureau, n.d.)
  • Narrative citation: U.S. Census Bureau (n.d.)
  • When contents of a page are designed to change over time but are not archived, include a retrieval date in the reference.

Webpage references are covered in Section 10.16 of the APA Publication Manual, Seventh Edition


by Christopher Heng, thesitewizard.com

One of my visitors recently wrote to ask me why her site did not have the two column layout after she published it online using the Dreamweaver web editor.That is to say, she had earlier designed a 2 column web page, but when she uploaded it to her website and checked it with her web browser, the columnsseemed to have disappeared. Another variation of this question, asked by another visitor some time ago, is why the images of a web page do not appearin a web page after it has been published, even though those same images can be seen when the page is viewed from within Dreamweaver.

Preamble

This is not a general guide on how to use theDreamweaverweb editor. It's written to answer a specific question asked by someone facing a problem.

If you are looking for a basic tutorial on how to design a website with Dreamweaver, please go to either theDreamweaver CS6 tutorial,the Dreamweaver CS5.5tutorial, the DreamweaverCS5 tutorial, the DreamweaverCS4 tutorial or the Dreamweaver CS3tutorial, depending on which version of Dreamweaver you have.

In addition, if you are a complete newcomer to website making, it may be a good idea to readHow to Start / Create a Website:The Beginner's A-Z Guide.

Otherwise, if you are someone who is really facing this issue, read on.

This

Background Information: How a Web Page is Put Together

When you design a web page, the content you write is contained in a part of the web page known as the 'HTML code', and it is very often stored ina file that has a name ending in '.html'. This 'HTML code' only holds the stuff you type, as well as the basic structure of your web page. Itdoesn't have very much information about the appearance of your web page.

Things pertaining to the visual appearance, such as the layout, number of columns, colours (or 'colors' if you useUS English), fonts,the size and placement of your text, etc, are handled by something known as the 'CSS code'. This is sometimes stored in a separate filethat has a name ending in '.css'.

In addition, if you have inserted photos or images onto your web page, these photos and images are kept in separate files as well. They arenot embedded into your HTML file.

A more detailed explanation of this can be found in the articleWhat is HTML, CSS, JavaScript, PHP and Perl?Do I Need to Learn Them to Create a Website? Don't worry. It's also written in layman's language so you don't need to be steep in the jargonof computer geeks to understand it.

First Version Of This Webpage Published

In order for your web page to appear the way you designed it to be, all these files must be published to your website. That is, the HTML file(containing the words that you wrote), the CSS file (containing instructions on the visual appearance of your web page), and any images you used(containing the pictures that you inserted into the page) must all be uploaded to your site on the Internet. If any one is missing, then yourweb page will not appear exactly as you designed it.

In other words, if your web page does not appear the way you designed it in Dreamweaver, it probably means one or more of these files were not uploadedto your website. Chances are that only your HTML file was published. That's why you still see the words you typed but not the visual layout and design,since the information about those things are contained in different files.

Solution

To solve the problem, re-publish your web page by clicking the 'Site Put' menu item again. This time, when Dreamweaver pops up a message asking'Put dependent files?', click 'Yes'. This will cause Dreamweaver to automatically upload all the necessary files for your web page.

Note: publishing a single web page using 'Site Put' is explained in thesitewizard.com's Dreamweaver tutorials, mentioned earlier.If you are mystified by the term 'Site Put', please check the main tutorials.

Help! I Didn't Get the 'Put Dependent Files' Prompt

If, after clicking 'Site Put' to publish your website, you did not receive the 'Put dependent files?' prompt, do the following to re-enable it:

First Version Of This Webpage Published Book

  1. Click 'Edit Preferences..' from the menu. That is, click the 'Edit' menu, followed by the 'Preferences..' item on the menu that appears.(On the Mac, you may have to click 'Preferences..' from the 'Dreamweaver' menu.)

  2. A dialog box, entitled 'Preferences', will appear. Look for the line 'Site' in the leftmost column. Click it.

  3. On the right side of the dialog box, look for the checkboxes for 'Prompt on get/check out' and 'Prompt on put/check in'. Make sure that bothcheck boxes are ticked. If not, click the box to put a tick into it.

  4. Click the 'OK' button.

Version

After you do this, do a 'Site Put' again. The 'Put dependent files?' prompt should now appear, allowing you to answer 'Yes' to cause yourother files to be published.

First Version Of This Webpage Published Citation

Conclusion

Yes, I know. The solution itself is actually very short and simple. But the background information was necessary because I notice thatnewcomers seem to be either gripped by abject terror when things go wrong or by despair. My hope is that with more knowledge about how thingswork on your site, you will be in a better position to diagnose and solve problems in future, when they occur.

Copyright © 2009-2013 by Christopher Heng. All rights reserved.
Get more free tips and articles like this,on web design, promotion, revenue and scripting, from https://www.thesitewizard.com/.

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Copyright © 2009-2014 by Christopher Heng. All rights reserved.
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This page was last updated on 17 April 2014.